Epistemology Archive

  • I’m taking Cathy Davidson’s Coursera course on the History and Future of Higher Education, so I thought it would be a good time to reflect on some thoughts about higher education that were prompted in a pedagogy class I took last semester. In the book , Jo Sprague discusses four potential goals of education: Transmit cultural knowledge – pass on the great works of art, literature, and science of which any educated person should be aware. Transmit intellectual skills – teaching how to learn, the mind is a muscle that must be exercised. Transmit career skills – the skills and […]

    The Goals of Higher Education

    I’m taking Cathy Davidson’s Coursera course on the History and Future of Higher Education, so I thought it would be a good time to reflect on some thoughts about higher education that were prompted in a pedagogy class I took last semester. In the book , Jo Sprague discusses four potential goals of education: Transmit cultural knowledge – pass on the great works of art, literature, and science of which any educated person should be aware. Transmit intellectual skills – teaching how to learn, the mind is a muscle that must be exercised. Transmit career skills – the skills and […]

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  •   Let’s play a quick a game. See if you can guess when the following passage was written and to what technology it was referring. The writer hoped that students could be taught by: “a single inspiring teacher who speaks to the thousands of revived students through [a technology]. A whole nation of students might thus come under the stimulating touch of some great teacher.” Maybe 2011 and MOOCs? Maybe the 1960s and television? Try the 1920s and radio, in this passage from Radiating Culture by Joseph Hart. Of course, it draws upon the same dream that we’re seeing being slapped onto […]

    4 Questions For the MOOC Dream and Higher Education

      Let’s play a quick a game. See if you can guess when the following passage was written and to what technology it was referring. The writer hoped that students could be taught by: “a single inspiring teacher who speaks to the thousands of revived students through [a technology]. A whole nation of students might thus come under the stimulating touch of some great teacher.” Maybe 2011 and MOOCs? Maybe the 1960s and television? Try the 1920s and radio, in this passage from Radiating Culture by Joseph Hart. Of course, it draws upon the same dream that we’re seeing being slapped onto […]

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  • An overview of Immanuel Kant’s Epistemology:

    Immanuel Kant’s Epistemology

    An overview of Immanuel Kant’s Epistemology:

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  • In our discussion of epistemology, we look at empiricism through the lens of three empiricists: John Locke, Bishop Berkeley, and David Hume:

    Introduction to Empiricism

    In our discussion of epistemology, we look at empiricism through the lens of three empiricists: John Locke, Bishop Berkeley, and David Hume:

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  • Merry Earth Day!  I really hope everyone takes some time today to ponder protecting the planet.  Better yet, just go recycle something or plant a tree…or both!  . In my first posting ever on Philosophy Matters, I discussed the interrelatedness of psychology and philosophy, and I mentioned some major schools of thought.  Today, I want to delve a bit deeper into behaviorism and some of the works of B. F. Skinner.  Behaviorism is known as the second major force in psychology due to its scope of influence (Jones-Smith, 2012).  Unlike many other forms of psychology, pure behaviorism is not really […]

    Behaviorism

    Merry Earth Day!  I really hope everyone takes some time today to ponder protecting the planet.  Better yet, just go recycle something or plant a tree…or both!  . In my first posting ever on Philosophy Matters, I discussed the interrelatedness of psychology and philosophy, and I mentioned some major schools of thought.  Today, I want to delve a bit deeper into behaviorism and some of the works of B. F. Skinner.  Behaviorism is known as the second major force in psychology due to its scope of influence (Jones-Smith, 2012).  Unlike many other forms of psychology, pure behaviorism is not really […]

    Continue Reading...

  • If you’re a regular reader of the Philosophy Matters blog, you’ll know that I’ve recently become very interested in Montessori educational philosophy, and written a few book reviews about some Montessori related works. Recently the interest changed from professional to personal when I found out my significant other was pregnant with our first child! After celebrating this awesome news, one of the first things I did was start reading up more on some of the didactic materials and toys that the Montessori education recommends. I discovered, first, that a lot of this information was not well sorted. It took a […]

    Montessori Inspired Toys

    If you’re a regular reader of the Philosophy Matters blog, you’ll know that I’ve recently become very interested in Montessori educational philosophy, and written a few book reviews about some Montessori related works. Recently the interest changed from professional to personal when I found out my significant other was pregnant with our first child! After celebrating this awesome news, one of the first things I did was start reading up more on some of the didactic materials and toys that the Montessori education recommends. I discovered, first, that a lot of this information was not well sorted. It took a […]

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  • A look at Descartes’ Meditations, with particular emphasis on epistemology.  

    Meditations of Descartes

    A look at Descartes’ Meditations, with particular emphasis on epistemology.  

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  •    vs.      In what may be described as an overzealous use of the library, my first trip to Wake County libraries consisted of searching for “Montessori” and checking out every in-stock book that appeared. While mostly successful, a few books that weren’t really Montessori related slipped under the radar, namely Amy WIlson’s  In one chapter, Wilson briefly mentions her child not getting into a Montessori school! Despite the lack of Montessori relevant research material, it turned out to be a pretty hilarious read, and offered a stark contrast to what I was reading in the other Montessori books […]

    An Educational Philosophy Contrast

       vs.      In what may be described as an overzealous use of the library, my first trip to Wake County libraries consisted of searching for “Montessori” and checking out every in-stock book that appeared. While mostly successful, a few books that weren’t really Montessori related slipped under the radar, namely Amy WIlson’s  In one chapter, Wilson briefly mentions her child not getting into a Montessori school! Despite the lack of Montessori relevant research material, it turned out to be a pretty hilarious read, and offered a stark contrast to what I was reading in the other Montessori books […]

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  • This week, a look at Plato’s Allegory of the Cave:

    Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

    This week, a look at Plato’s Allegory of the Cave:

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  • As a follow-up to the reading of Dewey’s Democracy and Education, I recently read The Montessori Method. Written in 1914, it purports to be one of – if not the first – attempt at scientific pedagogy. The emphasis is on designing education around a method that actually works for the way children behave naturally, rather than the way we would like to make them behave. A quote from the opening chapter drew me in: The situation would be very much the same if we should place a teacher who, according to our conception of the term, is scientifically prepared, in one of the […]

    Philosophy Book Review: The Montessori Method

    As a follow-up to the reading of Dewey’s Democracy and Education, I recently read The Montessori Method. Written in 1914, it purports to be one of – if not the first – attempt at scientific pedagogy. The emphasis is on designing education around a method that actually works for the way children behave naturally, rather than the way we would like to make them behave. A quote from the opening chapter drew me in: The situation would be very much the same if we should place a teacher who, according to our conception of the term, is scientifically prepared, in one of the […]

    Continue Reading...